3 Methods for Recording a Song at Home

Your brain works in a unique and individual way. Your mind follows a logic that many other people do not understand. If your methods of sitting down and actually recording keep you content and creatively inspired, then that’s how you should be recording. But most people don’t know what processes are conducive to their own productivity. That’s how I want to help you today.

I am going to outline 3 different logical methods / processes that you can use to record a song today. If you’re sufficiently motivated and inspired, you might even be able to finish a rough draft by the time you should be in bed. Give each of them a whirl, and hopefully you’ll find something useful – even if that’s just three methods you know don’t help you.


1. Compositional Recording

I hear songs playing in my head, and I’ve found that the best way to get them from my head to the computer is to figure out each part of the song section by section. What do the first 8 bars of the intro sound like? I reproduce that until I’ve got the basics of the music recorded, and then move on.

When I say “the basics of the music,” I mean three things:

  1. The groove on the drums/bass. I don’t have to have a perfect drum beat/bass line, but the groove in my head is fundamentally represented.
  2. The basic rhythm and notes on all the instruments. If I’m hearing a breakdown, I focus on rhythm; if I’m hearing a chorus, I focus on the notes. Sometimes I end up with more of a musical skeleton, sometimes it’s closer to a proper composition. As long as I can hear the song in my head through the notes, it’s good enough.
  3. General lyrical/melodic content. Even if I don’t have all the best articulation, all I’m looking for as I record piece by piece is to understand the basic form of the song in my head.

Once I’ve got a firm understanding of how the song goes, I can take the pieces and arrange them, cut them, mix them up etc. Then I re-record all the different pieces, filling in the melodic/rhythmic/stylistic gaps that are inevitable in recording section by section.

This method is most effective if a) you use loops, b) you use MIDI, c) you don’t have perfect pitch and want to get the song out of your head before you forget it.


2. Record from the Bottom Up (Or Vice Versa)

This is pretty much the most common way anyone has ever recorded in a professional setting. You record the song from the ground up: drums first, bass, other rhythm instruments (guitars, pianos, strings), melodic instruments (vocals, guitars, strings), and you finally end with the icing on the cake: any tiny fills, licks, transitions etc. that you want to color your tune.

If you’re a one-man band at home, this is a good way to record songs, especially in the case that you’re not a drummer first, and a bassist/guitarist/vocalist second. Drummers are really good at staying in time with a metronome, but most other instruments play more in time when they can play to a solid drum pattern. I’m not trying to bash non-drummers and bassists, but in my experience guitarists, pianists, vocalists etc. are all great at following the rhythm laid down by drum’n’bass. They’re not so great at leading the rhythm.

If you used process 1. to get ideas down, you might want to re-record all of the pieces in this fashion so that it sounds coherent instead of mashed together. This is just cleaning up the brilliance you came up with by recording section by section! ๐Ÿ™‚

Alternately, to spur your creativity you can do this process backwards: melody first, upper rhythm instruments, bass, then drums. You’ll still probably want to add the musical icing to the cake at the end, though. That makes the whole song sound much cleaner and coherent.

This recording process is great if you write your music and have a firm understanding of your song already and want to put it in MP3 form.


3. Go Old School and Record the Whole Band at Once

Back in the days of the gramophone (and more recently with the turntable), if you wanted to record a song with multiple instruments, you got your ensemble together and recorded the whole shindig in a couple takes. While you can make that all nice and complex and get a fancy interface that you can plug all the instruments into, you can also take one (1) omnidirectional mic (the Blue Snowball isn’t a bad choice), place it in a place where it can easily hear all the instruments, plug it into your computer and press record.

If that isn’t about as simple as recording gets, I don’t know what simple means.

There are several drawbacks to this process: if you don’t play with other people, you can’t ask them to come out and record with you. (It’s super important to your growth as a musician to play with other people! Do it as often as you can!) Also, it can be hard as heck to get the mic placed well so that you hear all the parts clearly and concisely, especially if you have more than four or five instruments playing (including vocals).

That being said, it’s a great way to record a song quickly and effectively!


So there you have it – 3 ways to record a song at home. They’re all effective, but definitely have their merits and setbacks. If you have any questions, let me know in the comments. You can always send thoughts, suggestions, and questions to justanotherhalfling@gmail.com as well ๐Ÿ™‚ Thanks for reading!

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justanotherhalfling

Musician, writer, sophomore in college extraordinaire, Just Another Halfling is... actually quite your average kid, and content to remain so.

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